wrig|gle

wrig|gle
wrig|gle «RIHG uhl», verb, -gled, -gling, noun.
–v.i.
1. to twist and turn; squirm; wiggle: »

Children wriggle when they are restless.

2. to move by twisting and turning: »

A snake wriggled across the road.

3. Figurative. to make one's way by shifts and tricks: »

Some people can wriggle out of any difficulty.

–v.t.
1. to cause to wriggle.
2. to make (one's way) by wriggling.
–n.
a wriggling motion or course.
[probably < Dutch wriggelen (frequentative) < wrikken to move to and fro, wriggle, loosen.]

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • wrig·gle — …   Useful english dictionary

  • wrig — wrig·gler; wrig·gling·ly; wrig·gly; wrig·gle; …   English syllables

  • gle — adan·gle; ae·gle; ajan·gle; ajin·gle; an·gle·ber·ry; An·gle·doz·er; an·gle·sey; an·gle·site; an·gle·ton; an·gle·twitch; ar·gle; ar·gle bar·gle; atin·gle; bo·gle; bun·gle·some; bur·gle; can·gle; cin·gle; com·min·gle; crin·gle; crin·gle cran·gle;… …   English syllables

  • wriggle — wrig·gle …   English syllables

  • wriggle — wrig|gle1 [ rıgl ] verb intransitive or transitive to move or make something move by twisting or turning quickly: She wriggled her toes in the thick soft carpet. wriggle out of (doing) something to avoid doing something: Don t try and wriggle out …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • wriggle — wrig•gle [[t]ˈrɪg əl[/t]] v. gled, gling, n. 1) to twist to and fro; writhe; squirm 2) to move along by twisting and turning the body, as a worm or snake 3) to make one s way by shifts or expedients (often fol. by out): to wriggle out of a… …   From formal English to slang

  • Wriggle — Wrig gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Wriggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wriggling}.] [Freq. of wrig, probably from OE. wrikken to move to and fro; cf. LG. wriggeln, D. wrikken, Sw. vricka, Dan. vrikke.] To move the body to and fro with short, writhing motions …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wriggled — Wriggle Wrig gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Wriggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wriggling}.] [Freq. of wrig, probably from OE. wrikken to move to and fro; cf. LG. wriggeln, D. wrikken, Sw. vricka, Dan. vrikke.] To move the body to and fro with short, writhing …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wriggling — Wriggle Wrig gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Wriggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wriggling}.] [Freq. of wrig, probably from OE. wrikken to move to and fro; cf. LG. wriggeln, D. wrikken, Sw. vricka, Dan. vrikke.] To move the body to and fro with short, writhing …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wriggle — Wrig gle, v. t. To move with short, quick contortions; to move by twisting and squirming; like a worm. [1913 Webster] Covetousness will wriggle itself out at a small hole. Fuller. [1913 Webster] Wriggling his body to recover His seat, and cast… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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